Perceptions of resilience, collective action and natural resources management in socio-ecological production landscapes in East Africa

2018.10.30

  • SUBMITTED ORGANISATION

  • Bioversity International; National Museums of Kenya; Arizona State University; National Agricultural Research Organization; Graduate Program in Ecology and Biodiversity; São Paulo State University (UNESP)

  • DATE OF SUBMISSION

  • 30/10/2018

  • REGION

  • Eastern Africa

  • COUNTRY

  • Uganda (Central Region); Tanzania (Tanga Region)

  • SUMMARY

  • If properly managed, socio-ecological production landscapes and the ecosystem services they provide can contribute to the well-being of local communities, as well as to the achievement of the global conservation agenda and of other relevant development policies at the national level. However, many of these landscapes worldwide are often highly insecure due to unsupportive government policies, agencies, and lack of local collective action. By conducting a network analysis and participatory exercises with district officials and farmers in two communities from Rakai (Uganda) and Lushoto (Tanzania) Districts, we studied local perceptions regarding (a) the contribution of natural resources to local farmers’ livelihoods, and how these farmers, in turn, contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of these natural resources, (b) landscape threats and resilience, and (c) major causes of the identified and possible local solutions for mitigating them. The study shows that in the four communities there was very little communication among farmers and that the cooperation between farmers and local and district stakeholders was rather limited. Farmers did not seek much information concerning conservation and use of natural resources and very few of them were aware of the existence of government programs regulating natural resources management. In addition, the study sites were found to be experiencing a progressive degradation of their natural resources. We, therefore, conclude that the creation of spaces for informed, public discussion aimed at making the institutional context more favourable for the creation and coordination of community groups and at enhancing their interaction, would contribute to a wider movement of knowledge and social exchange that, in turn, could ultimately result in the creation of local initiatives aimed at the conservation of natural resources and of the services they provide.

  • KEYWORD

  • Ana Bedmar Villanueva (Bioversity International), Yasuyuki Morimoto (Bioversity International), Patrick Maundu (National Museums of Kenya), Yamini Jha (Arizona State University), Gloria Otieno (Bioversity International), Rose Nankya (Bioversity International), Richard Ogwal, Bruno Leles (São Paulo State University), Michael Halewood (Bioversity International)

  • AUTHOR

  • Ana Bedmar Villanueva (Bioversity International), Yasuyuki Morimoto (Bioversity International), Patrick Maundu (National Museums of Kenya), Yamini Jha (Arizona State University), Gloria Otieno (Bioversity International), Rose Nankya (Bioversity International), Richard Ogwal, Bruno Leles (São Paulo State University), Michael Halewood (Bioversity International)

  • LINK

  • here

Summary Sheet

The summary sheet for this case study is available here.

Background

One of the outcomes of the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP 10) was the adoption of the “Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020” (CBD 2010). Among the key features of this Strategic Plan was the establishment of 20 Aichi Targets to achieve global biodiversity conservation. In particular, Target 11 addresses the need to establish and manage protected areas as effective tools for meeting environmental challenges. However, conservationists agree that protected areas are not the only tools for maintaining ecosystems (Woodley et al. 2012) and that in a concerning number of cases, the protected areas are not as effectively protected as they should be (Jones et al. 2018). As a result, the importance of integrating protected areas into the broader landscape is increasingly recognized (e.g. Ervin et al. 2010), and doing so is aimed at guaranteeing the conservation of ecosystems and the services that they provide.

For more details, please refer to the link below.